Eudists consider formation to be lifelong. A candidate’s formation begins long before he seeks admittance in the Congregation of Jesus and Mary.  It was nurtured since his birth especially in the family and the parish. Many life experiences and studies, formal and informal, have helped him grow as a person and as a Christian.

 

His specifically Eudist formation begins when the prospective candidate makes contact with a Eudist and begins to know the Congregation through a local community. After a period of mutual getting acquainted, the person asks to join the program of initial formation.  This period of initial formation is called “probation” and is the heart of the preparation for the definitive act of incorporation by which a man makes a lifetime and permanent commitment to the Congregation.  However, Eudists consider that their formation is ongoing for the rest of their lives.

 

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A candidate’s formation begins long before he seeks admittance in the Congregation of Jesus and Mary.  It was nurtured since his birth especially in the family and the parish.  Many life experiences and studies, formal and informal, have helped him grow as a person and as a Christian.

 

community

Special emphasis is given to the ministry of the community and its members. One of our mottos is “Together for the Mission.” In that sense, community life is important because it supports each member in his apostolic and spiritual commitment.

 

 

 

Because the Congregation of Jesus and Mary is a society of apostolic life, its members take no vows and wear no special habit.  The formation is similar to that of a diocesan priest.  There is no postulancy, novitiate, or other things associated with religious life.  Special emphasis is given to the ministry of the community and its members. One of our mottos is “Together for the Mission.”  In that sense, community life is important  because it supports each member in his apostolic and spiritual commitment.  The following is a brief outline of Eudist formation:

 

There are many ways that a man comes to know about the Congregation of Jesus and Mary. It may be through personal contact with a Eudist or one of our Sister communities, through a brochure, a poster or a website, or through a JPII81-14vocation campaign. Sooner or later, he will begin a process that leads to knowing better the Eudists through a local community.  Through a contact person, he will be invited to spend time with the community through regular visits or possibly an extended stay in the community. This enables him to know the Congregation better by seeing first hand its lifestyle and mission. In turn, the community comes to know better the prospective applicant.  This process of “mutual acquaintance” has no time limit and is determined on a case to case basis.  It concludes when the man is ready to seek admission to the Congregation and the local community is ready to receive his application.

 

Personal Responsibility & Autonomy

The Eudists subscribe fully to the approach to formation given in Program of Priestly Formation.  That document teaches that the #1 formator is the Holy Spirit.  The next formator, in order of importance after the Holy Spirit, is the candidate himself.  Therefore, Eudist formation puts a great emphasis on the candidate taking responsibility for his own formation.  With the guidance of his formators, he outlines his goals and the means for attaining them.  Within the community he learns to balance personal autonomy with the common good.  He is helped to develop his own gifts and talents while exploring ways to put them at the service of the Congregation and its mission.  Each candidate is unique and the formation team seeks to encourage personal development and the acceptance of personal responsibility.

 

Ongoing Formation

Eudists see their formation as ongoing and lifelong. For many, the local community is the place where this formation continues, especially through the Community Life Plan.  Some may pursue further studies or develop specific competencies according to their own interests and the needs of the community.  However this formation may be accomplished, as individuals and as a community, Eudists continue their human, spiritual, intellectual, pastoral and community formation for their entire lives. 
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